Allowing the Garden to go back to the wild?


Three years ago we downsized to a nice small modern house. The only thing we didn’t particularly like was the garden. Mainly because for years we had always lived in properties that were close to nature. However, this property had a ‘Designer’ garden, with paviours, raised beds with chipped slate and a fountain! But nothing to attract insects etc. Now some people may like this and I am not knocking them, good luck to them but it’s not for us.
So this year I took the decision to just make a start, and to stop keeping everything so ‘tidy’. ย I made a start on the raised bed with the fountain. Got rid of the fountain (it didn’t really work anyway) and the slate and just left it to see what will happen. ย Consequently since the Spring this year weeds have proliferated including stinging nettles, Ragwort and some strange plants cropping up from the spillage of the bird seed from the bird-table!

Imagine my surprise when I spotted on the Ragwort ย 25 black & amber striped caterpillars. They are of course poisonous – mainly, as I am informed – because they eat the Ragwort which is in fact poisonous. The bright black & amber stripes warn other animals not to eat them. They are of course the larvae of The Cinnabar moth.

So, I think this is a good start, and each morning I eagerly rush out to the garden to inspect my new little family who are slowly devouring the flowers of the Ragwort. So far they are all still in place albeit slowing down a bit and moving down the plant to what appears to be a ‘resting’ place snuggled up on a nice broad leaf.

I intend to keep a watchful eye on the and hopefully photograph their progress. The photo below of the fully grown Cinnabar moth is from another day and another site, not in my garden, I have included it here because I think it illustrates nicely the metamorphosis.

Cinnabar moth larvae
The Cinnabar moth Larvae
The Cinnabar moth